Sunday, 29 December 2013

Floods and frosticles

Awoke to frost, and finally it feels like winter. God knows we’ve had enough of mild and wet days, particularly here where storms and flooding have taken a harsh toll over Christmas. The river is bound by its banks once more and neighbours are starting to return to sodden homes, allowing us to welcome the most decorative incarnation of the third element with a combination of gladness and relief.

Fields that only a few days ago were under several feet of water have now drained, crisp tussocks of frosted grass receeding into the distance in the morning sunlight, instead of a stretch of eerily silent water. Things, it would seem, are getting back to normal; pasture and gardens will survive relatively unscathed, and the amazing resiliance and cheerfulness exhibited by even our worst affected neighbours suggests that it will take more than tempest, storm and flood to subdue the holiday spirit in this part of Kent.

26 December: Boxing day floods

29 December. Business as usual, albeit frostier

Cold and crisp in the garden this morning...







...and just as nippy in the fields





All this being said, I can’t escape the feeling that last December’s Frosticles were more impressive.

4 comments:

  1. Very pretty, frost does have its advantages not least it looks much nicer than dank gloom!

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    1. Quite right, winter doesn't seem to have arrived until the frost makes its appearance! Only fleeting I fear, back to soggy gloom from tomorrow.

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  2. Still waiting on a hard frost in Brighton. Only a few years back I could get aeoniums through the winter outdoors but the year of the great aeonium freeze put paid to that complacency.

    If it does freeze I will be pleased I left all the dying eryngium heads to be frosticled.

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    1. I think I might have also been hit by that Great Aeonium Freeze, haven't grown any since! I knew I was missing something (adds another plant to list for 2014).

      My old eryngiums are likewise in place for a good frosticling, as was the crocosmia which usually manages to stay pretty upright. Not this year, completely flattened!

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